Category Archives: Press Releases

Great Olympic Getaways

Beautiful Britain boasts some of the most breath-taking landscapes in the world no matter what the season. It may be a little chilly, but even the weather can’t spoil our leisure time. UK Tourism is proud to present its Great Olympic Getaway – with the jubilee weekend, the 2012 discount and a concentration of tourists in London, it’s a fantastic time to see what makes Britain ‘Great’.

If you are supporting team GB then we’ve got 3 handy holiday categories below – with ideas for days out, weekends away and long stays right through the summer. For Great Olympic Getaways & the chance to win a £1000 Luxury Getaway check out UKtourism.co.uk

Win an iPad2 and £500 of John Lewis Vouchers with Catalink.com

New competition launched to Win an iPad2 and £500 of John Lewis vouchers. “Don’t worry if there aren’t any catalogues or brochures you would like, simply fill in your details at the bottom of this page and you will still be entered into the prize draw (you may find something to suit your needs at Catalink.com where we have hundreds more to choose from.)”

Five Gastronomical Greats Of Britian

Take a look at a recent article from Lake Landecho about UK tourism and our involvement through uktourism.co.uk


With the approach of spring and some better weather, many people are considering where to spend their precious holiday time. uktourism.co.uk has created a list of Britain’s five ‘gastronomical greats’, which they hope will encourage people to holiday in the UK.


Ginna Clark from uktourism.co.uk said, “Britain is a nation of food lovers and we are fortunate to have such a great gastronomical heritage. It isn’t just by going overseas that you can be adventurous with food. One of the undoubted pleasures of holidaying in the UK is eating out and trying new foods, so we’ve created a list of some of the national gastronomic greats that you might want to try.”


1. Guernsey Farmer’s and Fisherman’s Market.
Guernsey is an incredibly fruitful island blessed with fertile soil and plentiful seas, the products of which are best experienced at the point of origin. Every Saturday, Guernsey Farmer’s and Fisherman’s Market takes place in the delightful gardens of the historic Sausmarez Manor near St Martins. As the market’s name suggests, farmers and fishermen from across the island flock to the market to sell their fresh produce. On offer are a variety of meat, seafood, vegetables, fruit, jams, honey and free range eggs, as well as a host of other local foods.


Be sure to try: Guernsey ice-cream, made from arguably the best cow’s milk in the world.


2. Earle, Cheshire.
Earle describes itself as a ‘modern brasserie’ and is owned by TV chef Simon Rimmer, who you may recognise from BBC’s ‘Something for The Weekend’. Set in Hale, a charming village in the heart of Cheshire, the restaurant prides itself on cooking top quality, simple food in comfortable surroundings. Expect excellent quality meat, fish and vegetables, most of which is sourced from local producers within a ten mile radius of the restaurant.


Be sure to try: The Sunday lunch which has been voted best Sunday lunch outside of London, by Square Meal magazine.


3. Cheddar, Somerset.
Everyone’s heard of Cheddar cheese, but just how many people have visited the wonderful village of Cheddar in Somerset? As well as cheese (which you may have guessed) the village is also famous for its fantastic ales and cider, which can be tasted in the local breweries and pubs. The nearby gorge, aptly named Cheddar Gorge is a very popular attraction, and was named the second greatest natural wonder in Britain, in a 2005 poll of Radio Times readers.


Be sure to try: The authentic Cheddar cheese at The Cheddar Gorge Cheese Company factory. The public viewing gallery allows you to watch the cheesemakers at work for as little as £1.95.


4. Pembrokeshire Fish Week 2011, Wales.
This year’s Pembrokeshire Fish Week runs from June 25 to July 3 and is packed with more than 250 events across the picturesque county. An abundance of fish species such as Mackerel and Pollack live in the seas around the Pembrokeshire, as well as river species such as Trout and Salmon in the county’s rivers. Additionally, the week gives tourists the perfect opportunity to enjoy the spectacular coastline, clean beaches and maritime heritage.


Be sure to try: An evening, fresh seafood barbecue at a Fishguard quayside pub or restaurant.


5. Biddenden Vineyards, Kent.
Set in 21 acres of glorious countryside, Biddenden Vineyards are Kent’s oldest vineyard, planted with ten different varieties of grape. A whole host of wines are pressed, fermented and bottled at the vineyards including Schonburger, Huxelerebe and Dornfelder, to name a few. However, if wine is not your thing, the vineyards also produce high quality strong Kentish Ciders and farm-pressed apple juices.


Be sure to try: The award winning 2009 Ortega, a medium full fruit wine, well balanced with a distinctive fragrance and good acidity.


Simply registering for a brochure can bring an added bonus as everyone registering at uktourism.co.uk will be entered into a draw to win a £1000 luxury holiday anywhere in the UK. That should mean you have enough spare cash to buy a few new books to take along to enjoy.

Brief encounter location one of seven best in UK

Take a look at a recent article from Lake Landecho about UK tourism and our involvement through uktourism.co.uk


CARNFORTH Railway Station has been voted one of the seven ‘must see’ man-made additions to a British holiday.


To celebrate British Tourism Week 2011, which runs until March 21, uktourism.co.uk has created a list of seven man-made additions to the British holiday experience and among the best of the best is Carnforth Station, setting of the movie Brief Encounter.


Train enthusiasts and film buffs will see eye to eye on a visit to Carnforth Railway Station, restored to its former glory in recent years, and the location for the filming of Brief Encounter in 1945.


As it was shot during the war, the location was selected by the War Office as being out of the way and an unlikely target for attack.


Filming took place at night in order not to disrupt train schedules.


The venues are spread across the four corners of Britain and offer entertainment for film buffs, historian, theatre lovers and tea connoisseurs to name but a few.


Ginna Clark from uktourism.co.uk said: “Britain is home to a vast array of tourist attractions, but not all get the attention they deserve. “Some of these you may have heard of, but others are still waiting to be discovered.


“With the British weather being one of the few things that can let you down on a British holiday, it pays to be armed with a choice of different things to see and do.”


“With the natural scenery, plus some great man-made additions, we believe that every day of a British holiday can be packed with fun.”


A wide selection of brochures is available on uktourism.co.uk to coincide with UK Tourism Week and to encourage holidaymakers to “choose the UK”. Everyone who registers on the website will stand a chance of winning a £1000 luxury UK holiday this year.

It’s official – we’re a wonder of Britain!

Take a look at a recent article from Chepstow Today about UK tourism and our involvement through uktourism.co.uk


The Forest has been named as one of the seven natural wonders of Britain.


IT’S official – the Forest of Dean has been named one of the seven natural wonders of Britain for its appeal to holidaymakers.


To celebrate British Tourism Week which ended on Sunday, uktourism.co.uk have created the list of locations spread across the four corners of Britain.


They range from unspoilt beaches to a breathtaking waterfall.


Ginna Clark from uktourism.co.uk said: “Britain is blessed with a variety of natural wonders and awe-inspiring landscapes, some of which are almost unheard of.


“We’re hoping this list will inspire people to not only holiday in Britain, but explore some great attractions off the beaten track.”


The site says of the Forest: “The enchanting Forest of Dean covers 42 square miles of Gloucestershire and is one of the last surviving ancient forests of Britain.
“Featuring dense woodland and trickling streams the idyllic forest is home to an abundance of wildlife including deer and even wild boar.

Cape is named as the nation’s greatest natural wonder

Take a look at a recent article from This Is Cornwall about UK tourism and our involvement through uktourism.co.uk


Cape Cornwall, tucked away in West Cornwall, was one of the locations highlighted to celebrate British Tourism Week, which ends tomorrow.


Designed to encourage people to seek out the little known landscape delights, the list features unspoiled beaches, breathtaking waterfalls and fascinating rock formations.


Ginna Clark from www. uktourism.co.uk, which compiled the chart, said she hoped it would throw a spotlight on places truly worth seeing.


“Britain is blessed with a variety of natural wonders and awe-inspiring landscapes, some of which are almost unheard of. We’re hoping this list will inspire people to not only holiday in Britain, but explore some great attractions.”


A cape is the headland where two oceans or channels meet, with Cape Cornwall the spot where the English Channel and St George’s Channel clash. Also on the list is Rannerdale Knotts in Cumbria, the unusual rock formations of The Roaches in Staffordshire and Gloucestershire’s Forest of Dean.

Holidaying In Britian

Take a look at a recent article from Travelio about UK tourism and our involvement through uktourism.co.uk


More British holidaymakers are choosing to holiday in the UK, not only to save money in the tough economic climate, but also to decrease their carbon footprint, claims web portal uktourism.co.uk.


Commenting on British Tourism Week, which runs from 12 to 20 March, Ginna Clark from uktourism.co.uk explains, “Consumers are becoming increasingly concerned about the impact of their lifestyles on the environment and the case for reducing your carbon footprint by enjoying holidays in our own fantastic islands is very compelling for the green holidaymaker.”


A 2009 poll by YouGov found that 54% of Brits have become more concerned about the environmental impact of flying over the last five years. The results of this poll may explain why more British people are considering holidaying at home instead of jetting off to continental Europe for example.


By avoiding flights, and instead driving or taking the train to a British holiday destination, a carbon footprint can be decreased significantly. For example, a family a four flying from London to Tenerife and back would be responsible for around 10 tonnes of carbon dioxide (CO2) being released into the atmosphere. On the other hand, the same family of four could drive from London to Kendal in the Lake District, and back, releasing only 0.2 tonnes of carbon dioxide in the process. In other words, by choosing the Lake District as a holiday destination a family would produce only two per-cent of the emissions that they would by flying to a European destination such as Spain.


The benefits for the planet become even more apparent when you consider the environmental impact of long-haul flights, such as Manchester to Orlando, in Florida. A family of four would be responsible for emitting up to 13.1 tonnes of carbon dioxide into the planet’s atmosphere. However, a family of four driving from Manchester to St Austell in Cornwall, home of the Eden project, would only create just 0.25 tonnes of carbon dioxide.


In the current economic climate, holidaying in Britain may prove to not only be more practical for many families but also much more cost effective. Ginna Clark from uktourism.co.uk suggests “People may find planning their summer holiday difficult, due to financial circumstances – but there are great savings to be made by holidaying in the UK.”


“We have found that at a time when everybody’s household budget is under pressure that more and more people are looking into holidaying in Britain this year, with Devon, Cornwall and the Lake District looking like the most popular areas for this year,” she added.


A wide range of regional and special interest UK holiday brochures can be found at uktourism.co.uk


*CO2 emissions calculated using Carbonica’s Carbon Footprint Calculator.

The Seven Hidden Natural Wonders Of Britian

Take a look at a recent article from Travelio about UK tourism and our involvement through uktourism.co.uk


The locations are spread across the four corners of Britain and range from unspoilt beaches to a breathtaking waterfall. Ginna Clark from uktourism explained, “Britain is blessed with a variety of natural wonders and awe-inspiring landscapes, some of which are almost unheard of. We’re hoping this list will inspire people to not only holiday in Britain, but explore some great attractions off the beaten track.”


1. Horsey Beach, Norfolk.
Featuring rolling dunes of golden sand, this windswept beach is almost deserted due to the poor access routes for cars and larger vehicles. However, the adventurous traveller can experience one of the best beaches that Britain’s east coast has to offer. Open between spring and autumn (as it is a breeding ground for seals during the winter) the beach and surrounding broads offer charming tranquillity.


2. Cape Cornwall, Cornwall.
Cape Cornwall is the only cape in England and features some of the most breathtaking views in the country. A little known fact is the definition as to what a ‘cape’ really is – it is a headland where two oceans or channels meet. In this case the English Channel and St Georges Channel. The surrounding countryside, ruins of former mines and waves crashing on the rocks below are symbolic of the Cornish coastal landscape.


3. Rannerdale Knotts, Cumbria.
Rannerdale Knotts is a fell (or mountain) in the heart of the Lake District, featuring some of the greatest views that the national park has to offer. Though one of the smaller Cumbrian hills, the views overlooking lake Crummock Water and Scale Force, the highest waterfall in the Lake District are breathtaking.


4. Benmore Botanic Garden, Argyll and Bute.
Regardless of the weather, an exploration of this magical place is guaranteed to provide an uplifting experience. Though the gardens can only be reached by river crossing, the short trip across the river Eachaig. Featuring hundreds of different species of plants and trees, including 15ft tall Giant Sequoias which occurs naturally only on the borders of the Sierra Nevada mountains, in California. The high rainfall and mild winters suit many of the more unusual species of rhododendrons, magnolias and nothofagus grown.


5. The Roaches, Staffordshire.
Deep in the Peak District national park the Roaches are a set of rocks, which in themselves are an unusual geological feature that have never really been explained. At the highest point of the rocks you can turn on the spot and only see a couple of country cottages in the distance. It is also said that a group of Wallabies dwell in the area, having been released in the 19th century.


6. Forest of Dean, Gloucestershire.
The enchanting Forest of Dean covers 42 square miles of Gloucestershire and is one of the last surviving ancient forests of Britain. Featuring dense woodland and trickling streams the idyllic forest is home to an abundance of wildlife including deer and even wild boar.


7. Pistyll Rhaeadr, near Llanrhaeadr.
In the heart of the Berwyn Mountains, Pistyll Rhaeadr is an awe-inspiring 73 metre tall waterfall which is one of the seven wonders of Wales. Author George Borrow, in his book Wild Wales, remarked of the waterfall: “What shall I liken it to? I scarcely know, unless it is to an immense skein of silk agitated and disturbed by tempestuous blasts, or to the long tail of a grey courser at furious speed. I never saw water falling so gracefully, so much like thin, beautiful threads as here.”


A wide selection of brochures is available on uktourism to coincide with UK Tourism Week and to encourage holidaymakers to “choose the UK”. Everyone who registers on the website will stand a chance of winning a £1000 luxury UK holiday this year.

Waterfall Named a Wonder Of Britian

Take a look at a recent article from Wales Online about UK tourism and our involvement through uktourism.co.uk


A SPECTACULAR Welsh waterfall has been named by tourism chiefs as one of the seven wonders of Britain.


At 240ft high, Pistyll Rhaeadr in the Berwyn Mountains, close to Lake Vyrnwy in Mid Wales, is the UK’s tallest single drop waterfall.


The waterfall has been included among the seven natural wonders released to celebrate British Tourism Week 2011.


Ginna Clark from www.uktourism.co.uk said: “Britain is blessed with a variety of natural wonders and awe-inspiring landscapes, some of which are almost unheard of.


“We’re hoping this list will inspire people to not only holiday in Britain, but explore some great attractions off the beaten track.”


The other six wonders are: Horsey Beach, Norfolk; Cape Cornwall, Cornwall; Rannerdale Knotts fell in Cumbria; Benmore Botanic Garden, Argyll and Bute; The Roaches rocks, Staffordshire and the Forest of Dean, Gloucestershire.